Bastion Bungalow

Bastion Bungalow

Bastion Bungalow, located near Vasco da Gama square in Fort Kochi, is a sea-facing Dutch heritage structure built in 1667. This elegant bungalow features an Indo-European style of architecture with Kerala tile roofing and a wooden verandah on the first floor.

Bastion Bungalow witnessed Kochi’s colonial history. From the 16th to the 19th centuries, Kochi was colonised by three European powers in turn—initially the Portuguese, then the Dutch, and finally, the British. In 1503, the Portuguese built Fort Emmanuel featuring seven bastions in Kochi. Most of this fort was destroyed by the Dutch in a war against the Portuguese at the end of 1662. Although much of the fort was destroyed, the bastions survived without much damage. Subsequently, the Dutch built a smaller fort around these older bastions. The Bastion Bungalow was constructed as a part of the Stromberg Bastion of the Dutch fort and it was thus named Bastion Bungalow by the British. The building survived unscathed through the British period in Kochi, and was in good enough condition that after India gained Independence, it served as the official residence of  Sub-Collector of Fort Kochi for a while.

The Kerala government converted the Bastion Bungalow into a heritage museum, which was thrown open to public in February 2016. The state department of archaeology in Kerala has declared the bungalow a protected monument. Sculptures made by 10 artists from Kerala are on display on the grounds of the Bastion Bungalow. The bungalow also has a tunnel in its basement which is closed to the public as the destination of the tunnel remains unexplored and unclear. Two canons from the colonial period are preserved on the balcony of the Bastion Bungalow.

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Bastion Bungalow

- by Kerala Tourism